Climbing My Family Tree, Part 21

Immigrant Stephen Larrabee

Stephen Larrabee (my nine times great-grandfather), most likely was born in France—the first ancestor I have discovered from that nation. The Larrabee name was originally spelled L’Arabie. Stephen was born around the year 1630.

Stephen was a Huguenot (a French protestant). He immigrated to America as a result of religious persecution by Roman Catholics after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (a 1598 law granting religious liberty to French citizens). Continue reading

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Climbing My Family Tree, Part Eight

Immigrants Edmund Rice & Thomasine Frost Rice, Thomas King & Ann Collins King, and Samuel Rice & Elizabeth King Rice

The Rice and King families immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony from England in 1638. The two families became extensively entwined when three Rice boys married three King girls. Samuel Rice King (my seven times great-grandfather) was born into the Rice family, and then was adopted into the King family. Because of this adoption 350 years ago, my mother was born Patricia Louise King, as opposed to Patricia Louise Rice.

Although the two families immigrated just eighteen years after the Mayflower, their history in the New World was vastly different from that of their Pilgrim neighbors to the south. The Rice and King families were Puritans, not Separatists, and their family histories involved deadly encounters with the native populations, in stark contrast to the relatively peaceful interactions in Plymouth.

The family story is one of war against the Natives, resulting in a succession of retaliatory attacks including killings, burning settlements to the ground, and the kidnapping of five young Rice children.  Continue reading