Famous American Immigrants

Ieoh Ming Pei:

One of America’s most famous architects, Ieoh Ming Pei was born in Canton in China in 1917 and came to the United States at the age of 18 to study architecture. He attended MIT and Boston. In 1942 he became a concrete designer. He worked as an assistant professor at Harvard until 1948 when he joined Webb & Knapp Inc. in New York. In 1960, he started his own architectural office, I.M. Pei & Partners, now Pei, Cobb, Free & Partners. Pei’s designs are famous for their geometric patterns and their characteristic use of glass. Among Pei’s many building designs are the East Wing of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the John F. Kennedy Memorial Library in Boston and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His accomplishments also include updating the Louvre in Paris.

Acknowledgement to David Sheen, WordPress blogger and immigration attorney in San Francisco.

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Famous American Immigrants

Albert Einstein:

Greatest physicist of the twentieth century. Born in Ulm, Germany, the young Einstein was dissatisfied with the restrictive schools in Germany. At the age of 16 he moved to Switzerland and graduated from the Federal Institute of Technology. In 1902 he became a clerk with Swiss Patent Office, where he worked with new inventions. In 1905 he published five papers, including the “Special theory of Relativity” which considered motion and the speed of light. The devastation of World War I caused Einstein to become an active pacifist. In 1916 he published his “General Theory of Relativity,” a concept of a curved universe and its affect on light. In 1922 he won the Nobel Prize for Physics. While visiting America in 1933 the Nazi party came to power in Germany and Einstein renounced his German citizenship for a second time. He chose to stay in America, accepting a position at Princeton University. During World War II, Einstein knew the Germans were working on the atomic bomb. He advised President Roosevelt of the dangers of the bomb in Nazi control. He appreciated that the United States had to develop it first, but begged Roosevelt not to use it. Einstein spent the rest of his life working for peace and died in 1955.

Acknowledgement to David Sheen, WordPress blogger and immigration attorney in San Francisco.